What is an implant?

A dental implant is a titanium post (like a tooth root) that is surgically positioned into the jawbone beneath the gum line that allows your dentist to mount replacement teeth or a bridge into that area. An implant doesn’t come loose like a denture can.

 

 

How do Dental Implants Work?

Because implants fuse to your jawbone, they provide stable support for artificial teeth. Dentures and bridges mounted to implants won’t slip or shift in your mouth — an especially important benefit when eating and speaking. This secure fit helps the dentures and bridges — as well as individual crowns placed over implants — feel more natural than conventional bridges or dentures.

For some people, ordinary bridges and dentures are simply not comfortable or even possible, due to sore spots, poor ridges or gagging. In addition, ordinary bridges must be attached to teeth on either side of the space left by the missing tooth. An advantage of implants is that no adjacent teeth need to be prepared or ground down to hold your new replacement tooth/teeth in place.

Types of Implants

There are mainly two types of implants:

Endosteal implants— these are surgically implanted directly into the jawbone. Once the surrounding gum tissue has healed, a second surgery is needed to connect a post to the original implant. Finally, an artificial tooth (or teeth) is attached to the post-individually or grouped on a bridge or denture.

 

 

 

 

Subperiosteal implants— these consist of a metal frame that is fitted onto the jawbone just below the gum tissue. As the gums heal, the frame becomes fixed to the jawbone. Posts, which are attached to the frame, protrude through the gums. As with endosteal implants, artificial teeth are then mounted to the posts.

  • Posts are surgically placed below the gums.
  • Artificial teeth, grouped on a bridge, are mounted to the posts.
  • Implants offer a very stable and secure fit.
  • Implants serve as a base for single replacement teeth.

Laser Implants

Dental implants are an excellent choice for replacing missing teeth, and laser dentists are a smart choice for placing implants. Laser treatment has many clinical advantages when compared to scalpels and blades—including giving more precise control to the clinician and more comfort to the patient.

Dental lasers are medical devices that use precisely focused light to treat tissue. The term LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation.

 

Lasers can be used as a safe and effective treatment for a wide range of dental procedures and are often used in conjunction with other dental instruments, remove inflamed gum tissues and aid in the treatment of gum disease. remove or reshape gum and bone tissues during crown lengthening procedures.

 

Do implants Hurt?

Placing an implant is often easier than taking a tooth out and is usually done using a simple local anaesthetic. You will not feel any pain at the time but, just like after an extraction, you may feel some discomfort during the week after the surgery.